lecture

Filtering by: lecture
Apr
24
3:30 PM15:30

Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen

In her recent book, The Ideas That Made America: A Brief History, Professor Ratner-Rosenhagen examines the history of American thought from the pre-contact period to the present day. She is one of the most distinguished intellectual historians of her generation. The book contains insights into key moments of American intellectual transformation, from the Enlightenment, transcendentalism, and Social Darwinism to progressivism, conservatism, and postmodernism. It explores American history by way of ideas, thinkers, and intellectual movements.

This event will be held in Carson L02.

Contact: Dartmouth College

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Jun
16
11:30 AM11:30

Bloomsday Celebration with Jim Heffernan

June 16 is Bloomsday, a commemoration of the life of Irish writer James Joyce, observed annually in Dublin and elsewhere with particular focus on Joyce's novel Ulysses. It is called Bloomsday because the novel represents the thoughts, feelings, memories of the character Leopold Bloom on a single day – June 16, 1904. To celebrate the occasion, Joyce scholar (and Osher member) Jim Heffernan will, during the brunch, introduce and deliver brief passages from four different chapters of the novel. Discussion will follow.

James Heffernan, Professor of English Emeritus at Dartmouth, has published studies of literature ranging from Homer's Odyssey to the fiction of James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. He has also recorded 24 lectures on Joyce's Ulysses for the Teaching Company.

Cost: $32, includes brunch and lecture

Registration: Register online

Contact: OSHER @Dartmouth

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Apr
18
5:30 PM17:30

Farah Jasmine Griffin (William W. Cook Memorial Lecture)

  • Dartmouth College, Sanborn House, Wren Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Professor Griffin's major fields of interest are American and African American literature, music, history and politics. The recipient of numerous honors and awards for her teaching and scholarship, in 2006-2007 Professor Griffin was a fellow at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. She is the author of Who Set You Flowin’: The African American Migration Narrative, If You Can’t Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday, and Clawing At the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever .

This event will be held in the Wren Room, Sanborn House, on the Dartmouth College Campus.

Contact: Dartmouth College

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Apr
17
5:30 PM17:30

Rebecca Rule

Rebecca Rule entertains. She is well known for her live presentations of humorous New England stories. Her books include Live Free and Eat Pie: A Storyteller’s Guide to New Hampshire. She also conducted an interview show “The Authors Series,” for ten years and currently hosts “Our Hometown,” which airs on NH Public Television.

Contact: Portsmouth Athenaeum

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Apr
8
5:30 PM17:30

Mary Louise Pratt (Annual Zantop Lecture)

Mary Louise Pratt will present a lecture titled, “Thinking across the colonial divide: From Micaela Bastidas to Clorinda Matto de Turner, Perú 1750-191.”

What is decolonization? Do we know it when we see it? This lecture explores ways of linking two major Peruvian historical figures whose lives were joined by geography and gender but separated by the historical divides between colony and ex-colony and between colonizer and colonized. It asks what lines of continuity traverse these divides, and how those continuities can be brought into view, notably through geography and ecology. It asks whether decolonization is best imagined as the ongoing mutation of coloniality.

Mary Louise Pratt is Silver Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, and the Department of Iberian and Latin American Studies at New York University, where she is affiliated with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and the Hemispheric Institute for Performance and Politics.

Contact: Dartmouth College

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Apr
4
4:30 PM16:30

Elizabeth Rottenberg (Dartmouth English and Creative Writing Lecture Series)

  • Dartmouth College, Sanborn House, Wren Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Elizabeth Rottenberg will present a lecture titled, “When Humor Has the Last Word.”

Professor Rottenberg was educated at The Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins University, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität in Freiburg. She teaches courses in the areas of contemporary French philosophy and psychoanalytic theory. Her most recent book is For the Love of Psychoanalysis: The Play of Chance in Freud and Derrida.

This event will take place in the Wren Room, Sanborn House, on the Dartmouth College campus.

Contact: Leslie Center for the Humanities

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Apr
1
4:30 PM16:30

Kathleen Hall Jamieson

  • Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Auditorium H (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Computers, networks and online control systems are increasingly being used by state actors and others for espionage, sabotage and cyberattacks. In this lecture, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, author of Cyberwar: How Russian Hackers and Trolls Helped Elect a President, will marshal the Russian troll posts, unique polling data, analyses of how the press used the hacked content, and a synthesis of media effects research to argue that, although not certain, it is probable that the Russians helped elect the 45th president of the United States.

This event will be held at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Auditiorium H.

Contact: OSHER @Dartmouth

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Mar
20
5:30 PM17:30

Brendan DuBois

Brendan DuBois, an award-winning mystery/suspense writer, will present his work. Mr. DuBois is a former newspaper reporter and a lifelong resident of New Hampshire. His publications include eleven books in the intriguing Lewis Cole mystery series, loosely set on the New Hampshire seacoast. Mr. DuBois is also a one-time "Jeopardy!" game show champion.

Contact: Portsmouth Athenaeum

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Jan
24
4:30 PM16:30

Emily Wilson (Hoffman Lecture)

  • Dartmouth College, Rockefeller 003 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Emily Wilson, Professor of Classical Studies and Chair of the Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania, and author of the recent translation of The Odyssey, will be presenting a lecture titled “Translating the Odyssey Again: How and Why.”

Why translate the Odyssey into English yet again, when there have already been almost seventy translations into our language? Prof. Wilson will discuss her working process and goals with this project, from questions of verse form and meter, pacing, style, word choice to narrative perspective, focalization and point of view. She will discuss her vision of this complex, magical, moving and absorbing text about identity, hospitality and the meanings of home.

This event will be held in Rockefeller 003 on the Dartmouth College campus. Please note that the location is subject to change; please check the Comparative Literature Program website for updates.

Contact: Dartmouth College Comparative Literature Program

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Jan
14
4:30 PM16:30

AK Thompson

AK Thompson is an activist, author, and social theorist. Bringing together a decade of AK Thompson’s essays on the culture of revolt, Premonitions offers an engaged assessment of contemporary radical politics. Inspired by Walter Benjamin and addressing themes ranging from violence and representation to Romanticism and death, Thompson combines scholarship and grassroots grit to disabuse us of cherished certainties. Whether uncovering the unrealized promise buried in mainstream cultural offerings or tracing our course toward the moment of reckoning ahead, the essays in Premonitions are both practical investigations and provocations.

This event will be held in Haldeman 246 on the Dartmouth College campus.

Contact: Dartmouth College

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Nov
29
6:30 PM18:30

Ben Kilham

Ben Kilham (Out on a Limb, and Among the Bears) will be presenting a talk titled, “The Social Black Bear: What Bears Have Taught Me About Being Human.” Ben will be available to sign books after the lecture.

This event will be held at the Fairlee Town Hall.

Cost: $10 for adults; free for students. Register online or pay at the door.

Contact: OSHER@Dartmouth

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Nov
13
7:00 PM19:00

Linus Owens (Landmark Academic Speaker Series)

  • Landmark College, O'Brien Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This talk will focus on the issue of free speech on college campuses. Linus Owens brings first-hand experience of the challenges faced by Middlebury College during the March 2017 visit by author Charles Murray, which was disrupted by hundreds of student protesters.

As an Associate Professor of Sociology at Middlebury College, Owens thinks about movements, places, and the conflicts that bring them together and push them apart. In past work, he has brought these interests together in exploring how anarchists organize online and the place-making and storytelling practices of squatters in Amsterdam.

This event will be held in the Brooks M. O'Brien Auditorium at Landmark College.

Contact: Landmark College

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Nov
4
3:00 PM15:00

Marriage, Metaphor, & Mortality: The Poetry of Jane Kenyon

By the early 1990s, Jane Kenyon and Donald Hall were one of America’s most celebrated poetry couples. He was an established poet well on his way to becoming U.S. Poet Laureate, and she was his former student, 19 years younger but already the author of four highly-regarded collections of lyric poetry. They were interviewed by Bill Moyers for his award-winning PBS documentary, “A Life Together,” and they toured India at the invitation of the State Department. Then tragedy struck.

In “Marriage, Metaphor, and Mortality: The Poetry of Jane Kenyon” poet Sue Ellen Thompson (They) explores Kenyon’s lifelong struggle with depression and what it was like for her to be married to someone who had achieved so much more in their chosen field. There will be a PowerPoint presentation with photographs from Hall and Kenyon’s life together, and several of Kenyon’s poems will be discussed briefly in the context of her life and marriage.

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Nov
1
7:15 PM19:15

Melville's Moby-Dick with Frank Gado

  • Dartmouth College, Rockefeller Center 003 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Frank Gado and OSHER@Dartmouth present two ninety-minute lectures that will present the novel as the pivot of Melville's persistent search for meaning in the face of apparent meaninglessness, and as an unsatisfied demand for justification of injustice. Everyone from high school students to pensioners curious about their country's literary heritage is welcome.

While attendees are not required to have read the book, your enjoyment of these sessions will be elevated by familiarity with this classic novel. Free and open to the public.

The two lectures will be held on Thursday, October 4, and Thursday, October 18. A Q&A session will be held on Thursday, November 1.

All events will be held in Rockefeller Center 003 on the Dartmouth College campus.

Contact: OSHER@Dartmouth

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Oct
23
7:00 PM19:00

James Sturm (Landmark Academic Speaker Series)

  • Landmark College, O'Brien Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In this thought-provoking lecture, James Sturm, the co-founder of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont, will explore a brief history of the language and art of comics, and the new ways that cartooning and visual storytelling are changing the world.

This event will be held in the Brooks M. O'Brien Auditorium at Landmark College.

Contact: Landmark College

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Oct
18
7:15 PM19:15

Melville's Moby-Dick with Frank Gado

  • Dartmouth College, Rockefeller Center 003 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Frank Gado and OSHER@Dartmouth present two ninety-minute lectures that will present the novel as the pivot of Melville's persistent search for meaning in the face of apparent meaninglessness, and as an unsatisfied demand for justification of injustice. Everyone from high school students to pensioners curious about their country's literary heritage is welcome.

While attendees are not required to have read the book, your enjoyment of these sessions will be elevated by familiarity with this classic novel. Free and open to the public.

The two lectures will be held on Thursday, October 4, and Thursday, October 18. A Q&A session will be held on Thursday, November 1.

All events will be held in Rockefeller Center 003 on the Dartmouth College campus.

Contact: OSHER@Dartmouth

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Oct
17
4:30 PM16:30

Emanuelle Loyer

  • Dartmouth College, Thornton 105 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Biography, a genre which has long been considered illegitimate as historiography, can be considered today as a laboratory for the writing of the social sciences, including, paradoxically, a way of understanding the social sciences themselves. Drawing on her recently published, critically acclaimed biography of Claude Lévi-Strauss, Emmanuelle Loyer discusses Lévi-Strauss through the double lenses of biography and the social sciences in a lecture titled, “Biographie et les sciences sociales: l'exemple de Claude Lévi-Strauss.”

This event will be held in Thornton 105.

Contact: The Leslie Center for the Humanities

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Oct
4
7:15 PM19:15

Melville's Moby-Dick with Frank Gado

  • Dartmouth College, Rockefeller Center 003 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Frank Gado and OSHER@Dartmouth present two ninety-minute lectures that will present the novel as the pivot of Melville's persistent search for meaning in the face of apparent meaninglessness, and as an unsatisfied demand for justification of injustice. Everyone from high school students to pensioners curious about their country's literary heritage is welcome.

While attendees are not required to have read the book, your enjoyment of these sessions will be elevated by familiarity with this classic novel. Free and open to the public.

The two lectures will be held on Thursday, October 4, and Thursday, October 18. A Q&A session will be held on Thursday, November 1.

All events will be held in Rockefeller Center 003 on the Dartmouth College campus.

Contact: OSHER@Dartmouth

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Aug
8
12:45 PM12:45

Emily Katz Anhalt

  • Black Family Visual Arts Center, Room 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Emily Katz Anhalt will present a fascinating new study of three classic works of ancient Greek literature, exposing their enduring relevance. These stories, by Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides, all emphasize the consequences of glorifying violent rage and cultivate instead the capacity for empathy, self-restraint, and rational debate. Emily will be talking about and reading excerpts from her recent book, Enraged: Why Violent Times Need Ancient Greek Myths.

ContactLeslie Center for Humanities

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Aug
3
3:30 PM15:30

Martin Seel (Sapientia Lecture Series)

  • Dartmouth College, Rockefeller Center, Class of 1930 Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Martin Seel, Professor of Philosophy at the Goethe University, Frankfurt, will present a lecture titled, "Two Dimensions of Language."

"We speak of understanding a sentence in the sense in which it can be replaced by another which says the same; but also in the sense in which it cannot be replaced by any other. (Any more than one musical theme can be replaced by another.)" Relying on this remark in §531 of the Philosophical Investigations my presentation will deal with the difference and interrelation between "poetic" (in a wide sense) and "prosaic" (more or less Fregean) thoughts. This will lead to the question of whether the traditional theoretical hierarchies – prose (and its analysis) as prior to (the analysis of) poetic language, or the other way around – are sound."

Contact: Dartmouth College

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